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The Eighties

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The Eighties
Doctor Who The Eighties HB.jpg
Written by: David J Howe, Mark Stammers and Stephen James Walker
Publisher: Doctor Who Books
Release date: hardback October 1996, paperback November 1997
Format: Large format hardback 118 pages and paperback
hardback ISBN 0-85227-680-0, paperback ISBN 0-7535-0128-7
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Doctor Who: The Eighties was a book which analysed the Doctor Who transmitted in the 1980s.

Subject matter Edit

This book is a detailed analysis of Doctor Who throughout the Eighties in the third of a series of decade guides.

Publisher's summary Edit

The nineteen-seventies saw the national institution of Doctor Who grow up, with adults outnumbering children in the continuously climbing audience figures. Advances in technology had produced more believable monsters and more spectacular special effects to complement an actor who had made the role of the Doctor his own.

But Tom Baker was leaving the show and a new direction was needed for a demanding new decade. Changes in the backroom staff meant a completely new production team would be in place. The series was to undergo its most radical change since the switch from black-and-white to colour.

To accompany the new Doctor there would be a new title sequence, revamped theme music and a new Producer, John Nathan-Turner, who would lead the team until the show's temporary demise in 1989.

The Eighties is the definitive record of the third decade of Doctor Who. Peter Davison soon won acceptance for his sensitive portrayal and the new maturity of the series' storylines. Colin Baker's moody and unpredictable interpretation reflected uncertainties about the series' future, ending in recriminations. And Sylvester McCoy brought the mystery back to a character still struggling in the face of falling ratings.

The Eighties is a meticulous record of Doctor Who's most contentious decade, and is illustrated throughout with an unrivalled collection of colour photographs, most of which have never been published before.

Contents Edit

Part one

  • Chapter 1: Dawn of a New Era
  • Chapter 2: Season Eighteen: Into Another Dimension
  • Chapter 3: Who was Peter Davison
  • Chapter 4: The Fifth Doctor: A Vulnerable Hero
  • Chapter 5: Season Nineteen: Unfamiliar Territory
  • Chapter 6: Season Twenty: Moving Forward, Looking Back
  • Chapter 7: Anniversary Special: The Five Doctors
  • Chapter 8: Season Twenty-One: Time of Change
  • Chapter 9: Who Was Colin Baker
  • Chapter 10: The Sixth Doctor: Larger-Than-Life Adventurer
  • Chapter 11: Season Twenty-Two: Video nasty?
  • Chapter 12: The Unmade Season
  • Chapter 13: Season Twenty-Three: The Trial of a Time Lord
  • Chapter 14: Who was Sylvester McCoy
  • Chapter 15: The Seventh Doctor: Time's Champion
  • Chapter 16: Season Twenty-Four: A Shaky Start
  • Chapter 17: Season Twenty-Five: A Return to Mystery
  • Chapter 18: Season Twenty-Six: The Journey Ends?

Part two

Indices

Notable features Edit

  • This book contains a listing of Doctor Who merchandise released 1980-1989.

Notes Edit

  • The "Welcome to the Toyshop" chapter was later expanded by David Howe into its own line of Doctor Who merchandise guides (Howe's Transcendental Toybox).

Publication history Edit

  • This hardback title was released priced £17.99 (UK). The revised paperback was priced £15.99 (UK).

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