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The King of Earth (comic story)

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The King of Earth
Tdtews
Doctor: Tenth Doctor
Main enemy: Nin, Ssaarg, and Hoolox
Main setting: Earth, London, Nin spacecraft
Key crew
Publisher: GE Fabbri Ltd
Editor: Claire Lister
Writer: Simon Furman
Artist: Lee Sullivan
Colourist: Alan Craddock
Letterer: unstated
Release details
Printed in: Doctor Who: Battles in Time (magazine)
Release date: 18 March 2009
Format: Comic - Part 2 of 2 (4 pages)
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DWBIT comic stories
The Day the Earth Was Sold The Guardians of Terror

The Doctor is about to be blown into smithereens!

Summary Edit

The Doctor asks the Nin to freeze the Hoolox's missiles before they hit the Earth, while he sorts things out. He uses his sonic screwdriver to teleport to Earth.

He arrives in a garden shed, where he finds a young boy called Robbie. Robbie is playing with a mobile handheld device he found. The Doctor returns to the Nin ship with Robbie. The boy explains he thought it was a game device, not real, but it doesn't help. The Hoolox and the Ssraar join forces, but their weapons are useless against the advanced technology of the Nin.

The Doctor takes the device from Robbie and calls the owner of the mobile device. It belongs to Fliant Wormbleeder, an intergalactic estate agent who appears as a hologram. On the Doctor's request, he looks through his catalogue to find suitable homes for all three alien races. War is averted and the Doctor returns Robbie home.

Characters Edit

References Edit

  • The Battles in Time comic strip sought to reinforce the association of its Doctor with the one seen on screen with ‘props’ from the TV series: his blue/brown suit, sonic screwdriver, psychic paper and his intelligent glasses.
  • The sonic screwdriver seems to have the power to transport the Doctor between Earth and the Nin ship.

Notes Edit

  • Supporting the series of collectable Doctor Who trading cards, the magazine carried a regular four page comic strip of the Tenth Doctor’s adventures.
  • The limitation of only four pages meant that stories often lacked depth compared to other regular comic strips running at the same time.
  • The artwork and colours were bold and bright, reflecting the tone of the magazine and, as did Doctor Who Adventures, reflected the appeal to readers younger than those catered to by Doctor Who Magazine.

Original print details Edit

  • 2/2 DWBIT 66 (4 pages) THE END!
  • No reprints to date.

Continuity Edit

to be added

External links Edit

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